Back to the source: A Kickstarter post mortem (part 3)

The video made, the budget and rewards set, all that was left to do was launching the campaign and let people know. I was prepared to spam all the social networks I had an account on in order to reach the target and make this project a reality. I was actually quite pessimistic when launching the campaign, expecting to miss the target by a few hundred pounds. In the end, the target was exceeded by 26%, which I attribute to a few rules I’ve given myself as well as a piece of advice which happened to be game changing. And of course, all the people who supported the campaign and gave it some exposure.

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Back to the source: A Kickstarter post mortem (part 2)

Once I had made the video presenting the project, the next thing to consider for my crowd funding campaign was the budget: how much money did I need to ask? Initially, I thought I would only need about £2,000, but when I started doing the maths, I realised that things were adding up VERY quickly, and ended up asking for £5,500. So yes, it sounds obvious, but actually writing down with a detailed budget is really important. You’ll realise you need way more money than you think (regardless of whether you pay for some it yourself, or include everything in your budget). And that’s even before the other “hidden” costs that come with using Kickstarter.

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Back to the source: A Kickstarter post mortem (part 1)

I wanted to make a film that nobody explicitly asked for, I asked strangers to give me money so that I can make it happen, and they did! In this series of articles, I’m looking back at what happened last month and trying to understand what has made this crowd funding campaign successful. Note that this is a naïve analysis of someone who’s tried for the first time ever to get people to finance one of his projects. Some of my remarks might seem common sense depending on your background, but I’m just sharing my thoughts, as they might be useful to someone out there.

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