Subtitles for editing foreign language interviews

Being my first feature project, there are a lot of things in Back to the source that I’m doing for the first time. But not knowing how to do something has rarely been an obstacle for me. Solving technical problems is something that I enjoy quite a bit, in fact. Case in point, foreign language interviews. In this post I will explain the method I use to prepare them for editing.

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Adobe Prelude: Introduction and ingest strategies

Back in July, after filming my first interview for Back to the Source, I realised that managing all those files would rapidly become a headache. I asked around if there was any software designed to manage dailies and someone told me to take a look at Adobe Prelude. And so I did. And I’m glad. It’s a young product, but Prelude is an invaluable tool to use before you start on post-production, especially when you work on a project that’s not entirely scripted, such as a documentary.

This is the start of a series of articles regarding the use of Adobe Prelude in my documentary project. This is not supposed to show the one true way of using Prelude, but rather describe the various steps involved in using the software, the pipeline questions that one might ask themselves and my personal answers to those questions. Screenshots might sometimes seem inconsistent with what I’m writing, but that’s because my pipeline is evolving as I learn more about Prelude and I’m not going back to refactor my test project every time.

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Back to the source: A Kickstarter post mortem (part 3)

The video made, the budget and rewards set, all that was left to do was launching the campaign and let people know. I was prepared to spam all the social networks I had an account on in order to reach the target and make this project a reality. I was actually quite pessimistic when launching the campaign, expecting to miss the target by a few hundred pounds. In the end, the target was exceeded by 26%, which I attribute to a few rules I’ve given myself as well as a piece of advice which happened to be game changing. And of course, all the people who supported the campaign and gave it some exposure.

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Back to the source: A Kickstarter post mortem (part 2)

Once I had made the video presenting the project, the next thing to consider for my crowd funding campaign was the budget: how much money did I need to ask? Initially, I thought I would only need about £2,000, but when I started doing the maths, I realised that things were adding up VERY quickly, and ended up asking for £5,500. So yes, it sounds obvious, but actually writing down with a detailed budget is really important. You’ll realise you need way more money than you think (regardless of whether you pay for some it yourself, or include everything in your budget). And that’s even before the other “hidden” costs that come with using Kickstarter.

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