Architecture photography is good for you

A few weeks ago, I went to Portsmouth, on the south coast of England, for a photo walk. I hadn’t done one in a very long while, and I needed to field test my new Fuji X-T1. I also wanted to try a 2-camera setup, with a 70-200mm on the 7D, and a 10-24mm on the X-T1.

Usually, when I do a photo walk in an urban setting, my focus is on street photography. But that time, I thought I’d try something different and had a go at architecture photography. Taking pictures of buildings usually isn’t my thing, but this turned out to be in many ways an eye-opening experience.

Details

Adobe Prelude: Logging media

Once you’ve ingested your media into Prelude, you can finally get started on what is the bread and butter of Adobe Prelude: logging content. This stage of the process is about adding extra information (metadata) to your clips, ranging from a description of the content, to the camera angle that was used.This is all in the name of making your life easier when you look for clips when you put your edit together. There are two ways to log content in Prelude: File Metadata, and markers. If you’re considering using Prelude, chances are it’s for the marker logging feature. But before we look into it, let’s see how that information can be of use once in Premiere.

Details

Adobe Prelude: Ingesting media

Once you’ve created a Prelude project and before you can do anything useful with it, you need to add some content to your project. This is called the Ingest stage. In the world of video production, ingesting media is a basically a fancy term for importing your files from your memory cards or external hard drive into your editing suite. When working with Adobe Prelude however, it deserves its fancy name as it becomes more than ever an involved stage in the pipeline.

Details

Adobe Prelude: Introduction and ingest strategies

Back in July, after filming my first interview for Back to the Source, I realised that managing all those files would rapidly become a headache. I asked around if there was any software designed to manage dailies and someone told me to take a look at Adobe Prelude. And so I did. And I’m glad. It’s a young product, but Prelude is an invaluable tool to use before you start on post-production, especially when you work on a project that’s not entirely scripted, such as a documentary.

This is the start of a series of articles regarding the use of Adobe Prelude in my documentary project. This is not supposed to show the one true way of using Prelude, but rather describe the various steps involved in using the software, the pipeline questions that one might ask themselves and my personal answers to those questions. Screenshots might sometimes seem inconsistent with what I’m writing, but that’s because my pipeline is evolving as I learn more about Prelude and I’m not going back to refactor my test project every time.

Details

Back to the source: A Kickstarter post mortem (part 3)

The video made, the budget and rewards set, all that was left to do was launching the campaign and let people know. I was prepared to spam all the social networks I had an account on in order to reach the target and make this project a reality. I was actually quite pessimistic when launching the campaign, expecting to miss the target by a few hundred pounds. In the end, the target was exceeded by 26%, which I attribute to a few rules I’ve given myself as well as a piece of advice which happened to be game changing. And of course, all the people who supported the campaign and gave it some exposure.

Details

Back to the source: A Kickstarter post mortem (part 2)

Once I had made the video presenting the project, the next thing to consider for my crowd funding campaign was the budget: how much money did I need to ask? Initially, I thought I would only need about £2,000, but when I started doing the maths, I realised that things were adding up VERY quickly, and ended up asking for £5,500. So yes, it sounds obvious, but actually writing down with a detailed budget is really important. You’ll realise you need way more money than you think (regardless of whether you pay for some it yourself, or include everything in your budget). And that’s even before the other “hidden” costs that come with using Kickstarter.

Details

Back to the source: A Kickstarter post mortem (part 1)

I wanted to make a film that nobody explicitly asked for, I asked strangers to give me money so that I can make it happen, and they did! In this series of articles, I’m looking back at what happened last month and trying to understand what has made this crowd funding campaign successful. Note that this is a naïve analysis of someone who’s tried for the first time ever to get people to finance one of his projects. Some of my remarks might seem common sense depending on your background, but I’m just sharing my thoughts, as they might be useful to someone out there.

Details